Computer Science

  • JESSICA L. SORRELLS, chair
  • PETER H. BROWN
  • JOSEPH S. BARRERA
  • AMANDA J. MANGUM

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

CSC 101 : COMPUTER LITERACY

Students will discover the practical use of computers to acquire, manage, and use information in the remainder of their education and throughout their career. This course introduces the basics of computer technology and provides hands- on experience with applications software for word processing, electronic spreadsheets, graphics, data communication and networks. Students who have successfully passed any 200-level Computer Science course must have the approval of the department chair to take CSC 101. Pass/fail grading.

Credits

3

CSC 125 : FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR

First-Year Seminars (FYS) constitute a common and academically significant experience in a student’s first year at Converse. All incoming first-year students are required to take a 3 credit-hour FYS course in the fall semester, choosing from a variety of discipline specific topics. Each FYS carries the corresponding departmental prefix, but with a common course number (except designated honors sections). Each FYS course is designed to have no more than 18 students, and counts in some designated category of the General Education Program. Strong writing and speaking components are elements of the course.

Credits

3

CSC 126 : NAVIGATING THE REVOLUTION: AN INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL STUDIES

Gives students a broad introduction to uses of computing across the curriculum, and to some of the ways in which computing is transforming both the curriculum and society at large. Topics of particular interest will include the ways in which computers represent data; the ways in which computers change our methods of communication; and the ways in which computing technology raises societal issues not previously seen. CSC 125 and CSC 126 may not both be taken for credit. Quantitative GEP requirement.

Credits

3

CSC 199H : FRESHMAN HONORS SEMINAR

A study of a selected subject within the discipline which will vary from term to term. The course is designed to encourage student participation in the intellectual processes through class discussion, research and writing, special projects, problem solving, and evaluation and defense of positions. When the subject matter duplicates that of another course, credit toward graduation will be granted for only one of these courses. Offered periodically in rotation with seminars in other disciplines. Quantitative GEP requirement.

Credits

3

CSC 201 : INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING

A study of computer systems, program development techniques, and basic programming concepts; emphasis on good programming style; introduction to a high- level programming language. Lectures and laboratory. Quantitative GEP requirement.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MTH 108 or equivalent.

CSC 202 : DATA STRUCTURES

To continue the study of the fundamental concepts of programming applied to problem solving and to introduce students to the major data structures (arrays, records, stacks, queues, and lists) and their use in Computer Science and classical Computer Science algorithms including searching, sorting, recursion, and pattern matching. Lectures and laboratory. Quantitative GEP requirement.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CSC 201.

CSC 208 : DATA FOR BUSINESS

This course covers the use of spreadsheets and databases to process and analyze data in a business context. The emphasis is not on simple calculation, but on using data, including large data sets, to generate insight. Quantitative GEP requirement.

Credits

3

CSC 209 : SPREADSHEETS IN DEPTH

Using examples from a variety of disciplines, students will learn the use of spreadsheets in support of work in the sciences, the social sciences, or business. Among the topics covered will be basic spreadsheet operations; spreadsheet formulas; graphing for communications and clarity; and the proper use of spreadsheets for basic statistical analysis. Quantitative GEP requirement.

Credits

3

CSC 235 : WEB APPLICATIONS I

This course provides a solid introduction to the client-side programming of Web applications. The first part will focus on Web design: markup languages (such as HTML and XHTML) and controlling presentation (such a CSS). This part does not require any programming background. The second part will focus on creating dynamic Web content using small programs embedded in Web pages. The course will introduce a scripting language executed within the Web browser, and cover the use of that scripting language to create dynamic, interactive Web pages.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CSC 201 or permission of instructor.

CSC 280H : COMPUTERS AND SOCIETY

A study of the societal effects of the rise of computing technology, centering on the ethical implications of several currently controversial issues. The course is built around discussions and papers. Writing Intensive.

Credits

4

CSC 290 : SOFTWARE WORKSHOP

A supervised workshop designed to develop competence and proficiency in using some commercial software product. This course may be taken more than once, provided that it is taken to learn different software and skills. No more than 6 credit hours in this course may be applied toward graduation requirements. May be offered any term. Pass/fail grading. Quantitative GEP requirement.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Consent of the instructor.

CSC 299H : INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS COURSE

This course is team taught by members in two departments and is open to Nisbet Honors Program participants and to others who meet Honors Program guidelines. All students registering for these courses must register not only through the Honors Program but also with their adviser and the Registrar’s Office. Quantitative GEP requirement.

CSC 304 : VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING

An introduction to developing applications using Visual Basic. This course is designed to show how to analyze problems, design solutions, and implement applications that use Visual Basic. Quantitative GEP requirement.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CSC 202.

CSC 305 : DATABASE DESIGN

Fundamental principles of database models and database management systems design, implementation, and application. Quantitative GEP requirement.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CSC 201 or equivalent.

CSC 321 : ESSENTIAL ARCHITECTURES I: COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND OPERATING SYSTEMS

This course provides a solid introduction to the fundamental hardware architecture of computers in common used, and an introduction to basic operating systems concepts. Computer-architecture concepts covered include assembly language, numeric representations addressing techniques, and subroutines. Operating- systems concepts covered include basic operating- systems structures, processes and process control, and inter-process communication.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CSC 202, equivalent or permission of the instructor.

CSC 322 : ESSENTIAL ARCHITECTURES II: OPERATING SYSTEMS AND NETWORKING

This course continues the introduction to operating systems begun in CSC321, and adds coverage of the basic building blocks of computer networks. Operating systems concepts covered include scheduling, synchronization, memory management, and security. Networking concepts covered include the layered model of networking, switching, error correction and flow control, addressing and datagrams, routing, the Domain Name System, major protocols (TCP, UDP, ICMP) and performance issues.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CSC 321 or permission of the instructor.

CSC 335 : WEB APPLICATIONS II

This course builds on the material in CSC 235 to explore more advanced topics in the development of Web applications. Topics to be covered in this connection include AJAX, JQuery, and Web application frameworks. In addition, there will be substantial coverage of topics from software development practice, as applied to Web programming in a team. The class will implement, as a team, a substantial Web-programming project for a client who is not the professor.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CSC 235 or permission of the instructor.

CSC 350 : PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

A comparative study of the syntax and semantics of programming languages; topics include data types, data control, sequence control, run-time storage, language translation, and semantics; actual programming languages are used to illustrate the concepts and virtual architectures of procedural, logic, functional, and object-oriented paradigms. Quantitative GEP requirement.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CSC 202 or permission of instructor.

CSC 355 : COMPUTER GRAPHICS

This course offers a hands-on introduction to 3D computer graphics, including modeling, viewing transformations, lighting and color theory, interactivity using events and callbacks, and animation.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CSC 202 or permission of the instructor.

CSC 392 : SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

Combines a range of topics integral to the design, implementation, and testing of a medium-scale software system with the practical experience of implementing such a project as a member of a programmer team. In addition to material on software engineering, this course also includes material on professionalism and ethical responsibilities in software development and human- computer interaction. Quantitative GEP requirement.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CSC 202.

CSC 400 : SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Each offering will deal with a topic selected from various fields of computer science. May be repeated for credit on a different topic. Quantitative GEP requirement depending on the topic.

Credits

1 - 3

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

CSC 430 : THEORY OF COMPUTATION

Introduction to automata theory, formal languages, and complexity. Introduction to the mathematical foundations of computer science: finite state automata, formal languages and grammars, Turing machines, computability, unsolvability, and computational complexity. Quantitative GEP requirement.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CSC 202 and MTH 205.

CSC 440 : ALGORITHM ANALYSIS

Qualitative and quantitative analysis of algorithms and their corresponding data structures from a precise mathematical point of view. Performance bounds, asymptotic and probabilistic analysis, worst case and average case behavior. Correctness and complexity. Quantitative GEP requirement.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CSC 202 and MTH 205.

CSC 450 : PROGRAMMING INTERNSHIP

A program of work and study in which the student is accepted as a programming trainee by a local industry. Pass/fail grading.

Prerequisites

CSC 202, or equivalent.

CSC 460 : DATA PROCESSING INTERNSHIP

A program of work and study in which the student is accepted as an apprentice in data processing by a local industry. The student is expected to be a productive member of the data processing staff and have some programming responsibilities. Pass/fail grading.

Prerequisites

CSC 450, or equivalent.

CSC 490 : DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SPECIAL TOPICS

Intensive independent study of a topic in computer science which is not in the regular curriculum. This study will be directed by a cooperating faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Offered on demand. Quantitative GEP requirement depending on topic.

Credits

1 - 3

Prerequisites

Consent of the instructor and the department chair.

ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING ANALYSIS

Engineers are creative problem solvers. They apply various aspects of math and the physical sciences to resolve technical issues, taking into account a wide range of specifications. They are frequently asked to lead or be part of multidisciplinary teams where good communication skills are essential. The objectives of this course are to: introduce students to engineering analysis and design techniques; introduce the teamwork approach to engineering, and to let students work on engineering type problems in a team setting.

Credits

4