English

  • LAURA FEITZINGER BROWN, chair
  • ANITA ROSE
  • EMILY HARBIN
  • RICHARD MULKEY
  • SARA TORRES
  • SUSAN TEKULVE
  • ERIN TEMPLETON, dean, School of Humanities, Sciences, and Business

Mission and Goals

The Department of English offers a Bachelor of Arts with a major in English, a Bachelor of Arts with a concentration in Creative and Professional Writing, a minor in English, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts with a major in Creative and Professional Writing.

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) in English offers advanced study of literary texts and criticism across a broad span of historical periods, genres, and traditions. As students progress through their the major coursework, they encounter specific authors and texts and develop their abilities in critical thinking, writing, and public speaking. In the fall semester of senior year, students enroll in English 496, the capstone course for literature majors. This course and its final project, both written and oral, should represent the culmination of student achievement and learning outcomes.

Degree Student Learning Outcomes

At the completion of their degree, students will

  1. demonstrate a familiarity with literary periods, genres and significant authors,
  2. deploy theoretical approaches using secondary sources in an effective manner, produce a work of extended written literary criticism,
  3. demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate in an oral presentation.

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in English offers advanced study and practice in the composition of Creative and Professional Writing. The program strives to create a broadly diverse environment necessary to foster creative and critical thinking, and reading and writing skills. In addition to the BFA track, students may pursue a BA degree with a concentration in Creative and Professional Writing. In the spring semester of senior year, students in both tracks enroll in English 498, the capstone course for BFA and BA Concentration students.

Fine Arts Student Learning Outcomes

At the completion of the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, students will demonstrate

  1. proficient level critical thinking skills in the analysis of creative work, whether published or student work,
  2. proficiency at sentence-level writing, including syntax and grammar,
  3. proficiency with the basic elements of form in genres in which they studied,
  4. an understanding of formal structure in the genres studied,
  5. proficient ability to move work from draft through the stages of revision,
  6. proficient knowledge of the literary traditions in which they write.

In addition to serving majors, the department offers ENG 101: Composition, as a service course for the College in which students gain writing experience, confidence, and fluency.

The General Education Program is a requirement for all degrees. The requirements listed below are approved for the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Fine Arts.

ENG 101 3 hours
Language and Culture 9 hours
MTH 108 or higher 3 hours
One course designated as Quantitative reasoning 3–4 hours
Health and Well-being Wellness 2 hours
Activity course 1–2 hours
Humanities 6 hours
Literature 3 hours
Fine Arts 6 hours
Natural Science 7–8 hours
Social Science 6 hours
Total 49–52 hours

Graduation requirements but not a separate course:

  • First Year Seminar
  • Writing Intensive course
  • Non-European/non-Anglophone course Capstone experience.

Major and Minor GPA Calculation for Department of English

A minimum GPA of 2.0 in the major/minor is required to earn the following in the Department of English:

  • Bachelor of Arts with an English Major
  • Bachelor of Arts with an English major and a Concentration in Creative and Professional Writing
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts with a Creative and Professional Writing Major
  • Minor in English.

The major/minor GPA includes all courses taken in the English department at the level of 200 or higher, including all major or minor requirements as well as courses required for any major or minor taken outside of the department. Transfer credits from other institutions do not figure into the required calculation for major and minor GPAs.

MFA Creative Writing Advanced Enrollment:

Undergraduate Converse students interested in applying to the Converse MFA program through the Advanced Enrollment program must follow the following criteria, procedures, and dates:

Student Eligibility

•Full-time, matriculated Converse undergraduate students of any major and school may apply to the MFA in Creative Writing program through the advanced enrollment option.
•The student must possess a GPA of 2.75 or higher at the time of application.
•The student must have completed at least 96 undergraduate credit hours prior to the start of Fall semester of the senior year and plan to graduate in May of the senior year. Students admitted and enrolled into the MFA program through the advanced enrollment program may receive up to eight hours of graduate credit toward their undergraduate degree. Students in the BFA Creative & Professional Writing major may count those eight hours toward the elective writing requirements for the major.
•Students will review eligibility with their undergraduate academic advisor and with the director of the MFA.

Timeline

Students apply during the Spring of their junior year and no later than October of their senior year. Accepted students begin coursework in the MFA Winter Residency/January term during the student's senior year.

Admission Procedures

To apply, eligible students will:

•Complete the official MFA program application form ($40 application fee waived for currently enrolled undergraduate students)
•Provide official Converse transcript (a final transcript at the completion of Bachelor’s degree will also be required)
•Provide two letters of recommendation
•Complete a personal statement responding to the following: Whose writing do you admire and why? Why do you want to study the writing of poetry, fiction, or nonfiction? What do you hope to gain from an MFA program? 
•Writing sample of 20 pages of prose or 10 pages of poetry printed and double-spaced.

Application Evaluation and Matriculation

•The MFA program's faculty application review committee will read, evaluate, and make admission recommendations in consultation with the MFA program director.
•Upon acceptance admitted students will remain an undergraduate, but will register for three graduate CRW courses to be completed during their senior year (CRW 600 during the Winter Residency/January term-4 credit hours, and a Craft Topics course and a Writing course in the admitted genre during the Spring semester—8 credit hours for a total of 12 hours over January and Spring term). 
•Up to 12 MFA credit hours may count for financial aid purposes as just another class, as long as the undergraduate student registers for an additional 12 hours of undergraduate credit during the senior year.
•Students who successfully complete the 12 hours of MFA credit will officially matriculate into the graduate program at the completion of their Bachelor’s degree.

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

ENG 98 : ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

This course is designed to aid international students with the English language and with the English-language educational style so that they might read, write, speak, and understand English sufficiently well to benefit from other classes and experiences.

Credits

3 - 6

ENG 99 : ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

This course is designed to aid international students with the English language and with the English-language educational style so that they might read, write, speak, and understand English sufficiently well to benefit from other classes and experiences.

Credits

3 - 6

ENG 101 : COMPOSITION

This course encourages the student’s achievement of a clear and concise prose style by emphasizing expository and argumentative essay writing. The course includes readings in the essay, level-appropriate instruction in research, in-class exercises, discussions of the student’s own writing, and conferences with the instructor. At minimum, students should produce 4-5 papers and 12 pages (3000 words) of thesis-centered writing.

Credits

3

ENG 102 : INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY TYPES

Readings in the major literary genres— poetry, fiction and drama. This course introduces critical concepts and vocabulary that enable students to analyze literature seriously and to create well-organized essays demonstrating their own competence in literary interpretation. Students will receive level-appropriate instruction in research.

Credits

3

ENG 121 : DIGITAL JOURNALISM PRACTICUM

Prerequisite ENG 101 or permission of instructor. This course is for students working on the The Conversationalist, the University’s online newspaper. Students need not take the three hour ENG 220 to participate in the production of the newspaper, and this course will give the student a laboratory experience with digital media. Pass/fail grading.

Credits

1

ENG 125 : FIRST YEAR SEMINAR

First-Year Seminars constitute a common and academically significant experience in a student’s first year at Converse University. All incoming first- year students are required to take a 3-credit hour FYS in the fall semester, choosing from a variety of discipline specific topics. Each FYS carries the corresponding departmental prefix, but with the common course number (except for designated honors sections). Each FYS course is designed to have no more than 18 students, and counts in some designated category of the General Education Program. Strong writing and speaking components are required elements of the course.

Credits

3

ENG 150 : STUDIES IN FILM

A critical examination of notable examples of film. Films representing a variety of genres (comedy, film noir, musical) and countries will be viewed and analyzed. Offered during Jan Term only.

Credits

4

ENG 190 : WRITING CENTER PRACTICUM

This course is open to students who have been provisionally hired as Writing Center Peer Consultants. Students will complete readings in writing center theory and practice and improve knowledge of invention strategies, revision ideas, editing skills, writing in core academic disciplines, and integrating and citing sources. Readings, assignments, and responses will be conducted online, while an experiential learning component will be completed within the Writing Center. Successful completion of the course is a requirement for continued employment in the Writing Center. Pass/fail grading.

Credits

1

ENG 195 : SPECIAL TOPICS

A study of a theme, genre, or period; the course may include film, video, or other media in addition to printed text. Course is intended for non-majors; will not count toward the English major or minor.

Credits

3

ENG 199H : FRESHMAN HONORS SEMINAR

A study of a selected subject within the discipline, which will vary from term to term. The course is designed to encourage student participation in the intellectual processes through class discussion, research and writing, special projects, problem solving and evaluation and defense of positions. When the subject matter duplicates that of another course, credit toward graduation will be granted for only one of the courses. Offered periodically in rotation with seminars in other disciplines.

Credits

3

ENG 201 : MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS I

Selections from British literature beginning with the Anglo-Saxon period. The works of major writers are studied in chronological order and appropriate attention is given to backgrounds and characteristics of major literary periods. The first half studies the literature to 1660.

Credits

3

ENG 203 : SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I

Selections from the body of American literature from the beginning to 1865. The works of representative writers are studied in chronological order and appropriate attention is given to backgrounds and characteristics of major literary periods.

Credits

3

ENG 204 : SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II

Selections from the body of American literature from 1865 to present. The works of representative writers are studied in chronological order and appropriate attention is given to backgrounds and characteristics of major literary periods.

Credits

3

ENG 205 : INTRODUCTORY TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

SP20 topic: Literature & Translation

A focused study on a particular time period, genre, geographical area, cultural milieu, or theme within the framework of comparative literary studies. Topics in this course typically cross national boundaries and perhaps even traditional structures of periodization.

The course emphasizes works originating from outside of Europe or originally written in languages other than English. These works are taught in English translation with attention to the original culture that produced them. English majors may not take more than one such course to count toward major requirements. Non-European and non-Anglophone GEP requirement.

Credits

3

ENG 220 : DIGITAL JOURNALISM

This course will introduce students to digital (i.e., online) journalism. The class will cover newswriting, editing, website content management, photography, videography, advertising, ethics and libel. Students will create a digital newspaper and participate in every aspect of newspaper production. This will not count as a writing elective but as a major or minor English elective.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 101 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 280 : INTERMEDIATE SPECIAL TOPICS

A focused study on a particular time period, genre, geographical area, cultural milieu, writer, or theme. English majors may not take more than one such course to count toward major requirements.

Credits

3

ENG 290 : ADVANCED COMPOSITION

A workshop approach to the writing of expository prose. The course is designed for levels of experience and is structured to give beginning and advanced practice in exposition, description, and argument. Advanced Composition will satisfy the GEP composition requirement only for those students who place in the course by a score of three or more on either the Literature/Composition or the Language/Composition Advanced Placement tests. Writing Intensive.

Credits

3

ENG 292 : INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING

Instruction in the writing of poetry and short fiction. Regular writing and reading assignments will be required. Student writing will be discussed in a “workshop” format.

Credits

3

ENG 299H : INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS COURSE

This course is team taught by members in two departments and is open to Nisbet Honors Program participants and to others who meet Honors Program guidelines. All students registering for these courses must register not only through the Honors Program but also with their adviser and the Registrar’s Office.

ENG 300 : TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE

A study of selected topics in the literature of the middle ages with concentration on British literature. Topics may include individual authors, genres or periods.

Credits

3

ENG 301 : CHAUCER

This course is a study of selected works of Geoffrey Chaucer. The concentration will be on his two major works: The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde. While the concentration of classroom discussion will be on the literary texts, an understanding of various 14th century concerns will be integral to the course.

Credits

3

ENG 302 : ARTHUR AND THE MATTER OF BRITAIN

The story of Arthur and his followers has fascinated people for 1500 years. In the middle ages it was the most significant secular subject in “history’ and literature, and its appeal to the imagination has persisted through the centuries down to our own time. This course is an introduction to the story of origins and development of the Arthurian legend as it has been presented in history and literature.

Credits

3

ENG 303 : ENGLISH LITERATURE TO 1500

English Literature to 1500 is a study of Old and Middle English literature (exclusive of Chaucer) in translation. The course includes significant authors, works, themes, and genres of the two periods as well as important movements and events affecting that literature.

Credits

3

ENG 305 : WORLD LITERATURE

A study of literature from around the world. Course of study may look at specific geographical areas, such as Africa, or may more typically combine literature from a variety of cultures. Non- European and non-Anglophone GEP requirement.

Credits

3

ENG 310 : TOPICS IN RENAISSANCE STUDIES

A study of selected texts and themes that reflect and illuminate the English Renaissance. These may include the Utopia, the Faerie Queen, Paradise Lost, the drama of Marlowe and Ben Jonson, and the poetry of John Donne.

Credits

3

ENG 315 : ADOLESCENT LITERATURE

Designed especially for students preparing to teach at the secondary school level. A combination method and subject matter course planned to evaluate and read the literary works which best relate to the high school student’s experience and training.

Credits

3

ENG 325 : STUDIES IN A SINGLE AUTHOR

This course will focus on the works of a single important author (in fiction or poetry) in either British or American Literature. The author’s body of work will be considered alongside literary and cultural conditions that contribute to the significance of the writer. Writers may include F. Scott Fitzgerald, Virginia Woolf, Walt Whitman, Charles Dickens, James Joyce, Flannery O’Connor, among others.

Credits

3

ENG 330 : EIGHTEENTH CENTURY STUDIES

A study of 18th century culture through literature. This look at the Enlightenment may include both English and American texts as well as selected European works. Women’s Studies.

Credits

3

ENG 350 : NINETEENTH CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE

A study of major movements in American literature from 1800– 1900 (Romanticism, Transcendentalism, Realism and Naturalism). Authors studied may include Emerson, Fuller, Thoreau, Douglass, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Twain, James, Chopin, Wharton and DuBois.

Credits

3

ENG 370 : WOMEN WRITERS

Topics in creative writing by women. Topics may include Feminist Literature, Reading and Writing Women, women writers within certain periods and cultural contexts, and specific themes such as women and art. GEP Humanities/Women’s Studies.

Credits

3

ENG 380 : SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE

A study of particular time periods, geographical areas, cultural milieus, writers, or themes. Examples of topics are Southern Literature, African-American Writers, Gendered Frontiers and Americans in Paris.

Credits

3

ENG 391 : FEATURE WRITING

Study in advanced feature writing techniques (human interest story, personality profile, travel story, and special event story). Lecture/workshop format. Offered Spring Term.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 291 or permission of instructor.

ENG 392 : CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY

Instruction in advanced techniques in the writing of poetry. Workshop format.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 292 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 393 : CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION

Instruction in advanced techniques in the writing of fiction. Workshop format.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 292 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 394 : LITERARY CRITICISM

A study of the important texts of literary criticism and practice in research and theory. Should be taken as soon as possible following the declaration of an English major.

Credits

3

ENG 396 : MODERN ENGLISH GRAMMAR

A linguistic approach to the study of English grammar. Students will be introduced to structural, descriptive, comparative, and historical linguistics. The main emphasis of the course will center on transformational or transformational- generative grammar.

Credits

3

ENG 397 : SPECIAL TOPICS IN WRITING

An upper-level course for students who wish to focus on one aspect of writing. Topics may include: Advanced Tutorials in fiction, poetry or creative non-fiction.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 292 or equivalent.

ENG 490 : DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SPECIAL TOPICS

This course allows students to pursue a course of study in literature and language not covered by the regular offerings in English. The student is responsible for devising the course of study and seeking a faculty sponsor and director. May be repeated for credit.

Credits

3

ENG 491 : ADVANCED TUTORIAL IN FICTION

Instruction in advanced techniques in fiction writing with a focus on one-to-one tutorial instruction and masterclass workshops with the Distinguished Writer- in-Residence. The purpose of the course is to provide intensive study at an individual pace in order to help students develop writing of a publishable quality.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 292.

ENG 492 : ADVANCED TUTORIAL IN POETRY

Instruction in advanced techniques in poetry writing with a focus on one-to-one tutorial instruction and master class workshops with the Distinguished Writer- Residence. The purpose of the course is to provide intensive study at an individual pace in order to help students develop writing of a publishable quality.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 292.

ENG 493 : PUBLICATIONS/MEDIA INTERNSHIP

Designed to accommodate those students engaged in internships in publishing (newspaper, magazine, book), TV, radio and advertising. Generally requires assignment of a written project in addition to the internship work experience. May be taken more than once with the approval of the department. Pass/fail grading.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 291.

ENG 496 : BA SENIOR SEMINAR

This course will provide the opportunity to develop a substantial scholarly project, as well as hone public speaking skills in the presentation of a semester- long research project. Capstone. Writing Intensive.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A minimum 2.0 GPA in the major; completion of eight courses in English at the 200 level or higher, including Eng394 or have permission of the instructor in consultation with the department. Required of all Bachelor of Arts with an English major; offered in the fall term of the senior year.

ENG 497 : HONORS

Independent research and thesis written under the direction of a member of the English faculty. Students must be recommended by the department.

Credits

3

ENG 498 : BFA SENIOR SEMINAR

The seminar offers the opportunity to develop a book length collection of poetry (35-45 pages) or prose (40-50 pages) along with a critical introduction to the work that details how the student author’s writing fits into the contemporary literature scene. In addition, the student creates a reading list developed in consultation with the project director and completes a final oral defense of the senior project. Projects directed by faculty sponsors. Capstone. Offered in the Spring Term of the senior year.

Credits

3