Education

  • LIENNE MEDFORD, Dean
  • KELLY HARRISON-MAGUIRE, Associate Dean

Department of Education

  • REED CHEWNING
  • D. WAYNE CHESER
  • WILLIAM CORDER
  • ELAINA GHIONIS
  • JULIE JONES
  • MARGARET LEE
  • JAMES LIES
  • MARGARET PARK
  • DENEISHA SCOTT-POE
  • SHIRLEY SEALY, chair
  • ADELAIDE WATSON
  • SEAL NISBET WILSON

The Institutional Standards

Professional education courses and experiences, combined with liberal arts courses, promote the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential for education. These learning outcomes embody the following “Institutional Standards” to ensure candidates develop an understanding of the critical concepts and principles of their discipline and facilitate candidates' reflection of their potential biases to increase their understanding and practice of equity, diversity, and inclusion.  

Education Program Completers

  1. Demonstrates knowledge of and application of critical concepts and principles of learner development (INTASC Standard 1), learning differences (INTASC Standard 2).
  2. Create safe and supportive learning environments to work with diverse students and families  (INTASC Standard 3). 
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of central concepts in their content areas (INTASC standard 4).
  4. Implement instructional strategies for diverse learners (INTASC Standard 5).
  5. Demonstrate ability to assess student work, plan for instruction, and differentiated instructional strategies for diverse learners (INTASC Standards, 6, 7, & 8).
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of technological pedagogical knowledge to engage and improve learning for all students. 
  7. Demonstrate knowledge of professional responsibility and engage in professional development, act ethically, take responsibility for student learning, and collaborate with students and families (INTASC Standards 9. &10)

The Converse University Department of Education is the central undergraduate home for teacher education programs in Education. The Department of Education offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in the following teacher education programs: art (PK– 12), early childhood (PK–3), elementary (2–6), comprehensive special education (PK–12), deaf and hard of hearing (PK–12), intellectual disabilities (PK–12), learning disabilities (PK–12), English (9–12), and social studies (9–12).

Bachelor of Music degree in music education (choral and instrumental) (PK–12), resides in the Petrie School of Music. This degree has a specific course of study. Details are in the Petrie School of Music Student Handbook and the Undergraduate Catalog. The Department of Art and Design offers the Bachelor of Arts in Art Education (PK-12). Details are in the Undergraduate Catalog. Full-time Converse faculty members teach a majority of the education courses in each program. Students interested in teaching as a career may complete one or more of the programs described in this section. Students who fulfill the requirements of one or more of these programs can meet the certification requirements for teachers in South Carolina and in several other states. Those who wish to teach on the secondary level complete a 30-hour minor (32 for science teachers) in secondary education to complement appropriate liberal arts major.

The teacher education certification program prepares teacher candidates to become well-qualified teachers and licensed professionals who possess knowledge and skills in innovative teaching methods and research-based practice. Candidates follow the teacher education program as outlined in the Teacher Education Handbook found on the Converse University website. Student teaching is the capstone experience for all teacher education programs.

All education majors must take the CORE PRAXIS (or have qualifying SAT/ACT scores) for admission to Teacher Education. PRAXIS II examinations as well as the Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) examinations must be taken before graduation.

Admission to Teacher Education

Teacher candidates should be familiar with the department website that contains descriptions of programs, The Teacher Education Handbook, the Clinical Experience Handbook, the Student Teaching Handbook, important details, policies, and announcements.
Apply for admission to the Teacher Education Admission Program after completion of EDU 360, Introduction to Education, and after you have met all of the following criteria:

  1. Completion of 45 hours of coursework
  2. 2.75 minimum cumulative GPA
  3. A passing grade for first major clinical in their major program
  4. Passing scores on the Core Praxis exams (reading, writing, and math) or have qualifying SAT/ACT scores
  5. Completion of required items on the Student Worklist in Canvas: (Livetext subscription, SLED check, Negative TB test, Negative Sex Offender Registry, Travel Form, Blood Borne Pathogens Test, Education Economic Development Test, and Phase II Interview Questions and Answers (within the same semester as EDU360)
  6. Secondary Education minor candidates require 3.0 in content area courses.
  7. Statement of Disclosure-prior felony misdemeanor convictions

Resources are available to help a student prepare for the CORE PRAXIS exams. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is a prerequisite to enrolling in Benchmark II courses. For transfer students, Converse uses all attempted coursework prior to enrollment at Converse and all coursework at Converse to determine cumulative GPA. Converse will cancel a failing grade at another institution if a student retakes and passes a comparable course at Converse, and if the Registrar approves. Such cancellation makes the policy for transfers compatible with the Converse policy for retaking courses.

During the senior year, students are eligible for placement in student teaching. A student planning to student teach in the Fall Term of her senior year must submit her request for placement by February 15 of the junior year. A student planning to student teach in the Spring Term of her senior year must submit her request for placement by June 15 before the senior year. Only those students currently accepted in a degree program can be eligible for student teaching. 

Other requirements prior to student teaching include an application for certification to the South Carolina State Department of Education and an FBI background check. Details about this application and other requirements are available on the department webpage at www.converse.edu., on the South Carolina State Department website: https://ed.sc.gov, and from departmental staff. Generally, the applications for certification are due to the Education Department by February 15, a year in advance of Fall Term student teaching, and by June 15, a year in advance of Spring Term student teaching. Passing scores on both the CORE PRAXIS and the appropriate PRAXIS Subject Assessments are among the requirements for certification. Because test requirements change, students should consult the State Department website: https://ed.sc.gov to be sure they register for the appropriate PRAXIS II test(s). Students must request that the Educational Testing Service submit their scores for CORE PRAXIS and PRAXIS Subject Assessments both to Converse and to the South Carolina State Department of Education.

The General Education Program is a requirement for all degrees. The requirements listed below are approved for the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Fine Arts.

ENG 101 3 hours
Language and Culture 9 hours
MTH 108 or higher 3 hours
One course designated as Quantitative reasoning 3–4 hours
Health and Well-being Wellness 2 hours
Activity course 1–2 hours
Humanities 6 hours
Literature 3 hours
Fine Arts 6 hours
Natural Science 7–8 hours
Social Science 6 hours
Total 49–52 hours

Graduation requirements but not a separate course:

  • First-Year Seminar
  • Writing Intensive course
  • Non-European/non-Anglophone course Capstone experience

Course work in all major and minor teacher education programs includes instruction in the use of computer technology and software, SC Academic Standards, and SC Safe School Climate Act. Before student teaching, students must complete two sequential, incremental clinical experiences and SCTS4.0 training. The two clinical experiences include at least 100 hours of participation. Teacher candidates complete work and projects throughout their major coursework aligned with the South Carolina Teaching Standards, including the Unit Work Sample and Student Learning Outcome (SLO) impact on student learning assessment. 

All states require completion of a program of general education for teacher certification. The requirements of these programs vary from state to state. The Converse GEP includes many of the requirements of other states. However, if a student wants to meet the requirements of a specific state, he/she may need to make certain choices in the GEP. The student should write directly to the state department of education for complete and up-to-date information about teacher certification in states in which he/she may wish to teach.

Required GPA for a Bachelor of Arts degree within all majors in the Department of Education.

In order to graduate, teacher candidates must have a Converse GPA of at least 2.0 in the major courses listed on their Program Worksheets and in any completed electives with prefixes of EDU and SED. Teacher candidates must have a C or better in courses designated as Read-to-Succeed courses.  

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

EDU 075: DEVELOPMENTAL/REMEDIAL MATH

Class Program
Credits 0
This remedial course helps students develop and improve their skills in arithmetic concepts and operations, measurement, geometry and problem solving. The student will complete a pre-test and post-test of math proficiency. Pass/fail grading. Special fee.

EDU 076: DEVELOPMENTAL/REMEDIAL WRITING

Class Program
Credits 0
This remedial course prepares the student for writing a good composition. The student will complete a pre-test and post-test of composition proficiency. The students/instructors will use a four-point holistic scale, which includes the specific skills of composing, sentence formation, usage, and mechanics; to score compositions. The Writing Center is available to aid all students preparing for the writing portion of the CORE PRAXIS exam at any time on an informal basis. Pass/fail grading. Special fee.

EDU 077: DEVELOPMENTAL/REMEDIAL READING

Class Program
Credits 0
This remedial course aids the student in developing literal and inferential comprehension skills, reference usage skills, and contextual word meaning skills. The student will complete both a pre-test and a post-test of reading proficiency. Pass/fail grading. Special fee.

EDU 101: CLINICAL I: READING

Class Program
Credits 1

This supervised clinical is the first of two sequential, incremental clinical experiences for special education and elementary (40 hours required), and early childhood (50 hours required) majors. Students work with an individual child or small group, assess and plan instruction in the area of reading, assist in building the child’s self-esteem and confidence, aid in the development of thinking skills, and gain experience, practice, and training in the application of theory and skills when working with students. The candidates will give at least three pre- and post-assessments to determine the impact of student learning from the beginning of the clinical experience to the end. They will also teach a minimum of five lessons to an individual student and/or small group of students. Pass/Fail Grading. Offered Fall and Spring. Students must sign up for the clinical using www.tinyurl.com/clinicals

Notes

Major credit. Prerequisite for all education students: PRAXIS CORE: Passing scores in reading, writing, and math; Must be taken concurrently with EDU301 or EDU307.

EDU 102: CLINICAL II: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Class Program
Credits 3

This supervised 50-hour clinical is the second of two sequential, incremental clinical experiences for early childhood majors. Students work in a public school setting with a partnership school and observe, manage, plan for and instruct a large group, as opposed to an individual child. The course gives students the experience, practice, and training in technology, arts integration, and classroom management and the application of theory and skills acquired in core courses in early childhood education. This practicum builds on the experiences in EDU 101. All placements are in a partnership school. No placement requests are allowed for this clinical. Offered Fall and Spring Terms.

Prerequisites

EDU 101 and Admission to Teacher Education.

Prerequisite Courses

EDU 103: CLINICAL II: ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

Class Program
Credits 3

This supervised 50-hour practicum graded on a pass/fail basis is the second of two sequential, incremental clinical experiences required of elementary majors. Students work in a public school setting and observe, manage, plan for, and instruct a large group, as opposed to an individual child. The practicum gives students the experience, practice, and training in the application of theory and skills in the classroom acquired in core courses in elementary education. This practicum builds on the experiences in EDU101. Sign-up deadlines are involved. Pass/Fail grading. Offered Fall and Spring terms.

Prerequisite Courses

EDU 125: FRESHMAN YEAR SEMINAR: LEARNING ACCORDING TO HOLLYWOOD

Class Program
Credits 3

First-Year Seminars constitute a common and academically significant experience in a student’s first year at Converse University. All incoming first- year students are required to take a 3-credit hour FYS in the fall semester, choosing from a variety of discipline specific topics. Each FYS carries the corresponding departmental prefix, but with the common number (except for designated honors sections). Each FYS course is designed to have no more than 18 students and counts in some designated category of the General Education Program. Strong writing and speaking components are required of the course.

Notes

GEP Social Sciences

EDU 150: TEACHING PEDAGOGY THROUGH FILM

Class Program
Credits 3
Students will view a variety of films and TV episodes and read articles about learning, teaching, and motivation as they contemplate how personal beliefs and experiences in education have shaped or continue to influence their desire to learn. GEP Social Sciences.

EDU 201: CLINICAL I: SECONDARY

Class Program
Credits 3

Required of all prospective secondary teachers. The course is for prospective secondary school teachers in all academic areas. Students observe and participate in the instructional program of a secondary school under the supervision of a classroom teacher and a college supervisor. Requirements include seminars, assigned readings, and the preparation of a journal to supplement the field experiences. Faculty advisers can supply sign-up deadlines for each term. Pass/fail grading. Offered Spring Term.

Corequisites

EDU 331, EDU 333, EDU 334 or EDU 335.

Notes

Minor credit.

EDU 202: CLINICAL II: CONTENT READING

Class Program
Credits 0

This supervised clinical is the second of two required sequential, incremental clinical experiences for secondary education majors. In a classroom setting appropriate to their major, teacher candidates focus on such topics as self-esteem, thinking skills, and vocabulary development. Faculty advisers can supply sign-up deadlines for each term. Pass/fail grading. Offered in Fall Term.

Prerequisites

EDU 201 and Admission to Teacher education.

Prerequisite Courses

EDU 203: TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

Class Program
Credits 3

This course will introduce students to the importance of current technology in the PreK – 12th grade classroom. It will cover basic teaching knowledge, learning preferences, and instructional support, all related to modern technology. It will also introduce students to various digital tools to support student academic goals, teacher pedagogy, and different student learning styles. The course is designed to utilize technology
during each class session. The course will also introduce students to effective lesson planning and classroom management and how they correlate with the effective integration of technology.

Notes

Elective credit.

EDU 301: READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM

Class Program
Credits 3

This course will equip the elementary candidate with the tools necessary to diagnose and remediate the struggling readers in the general education classroom. Along with analysis of various assessment data, the candidate will be involved with the study of the language arts; theoretical models for literacy development and learning; and the foundations of reading behaviors and stages of reading development.

Co-Requisite Courses
Notes

Major credit. Prerequisites for all education students: EDU360; PRAXIS CORE: Passing scores in reading, writing, and math; EDU309 (except for special education majors).

EDU 302: K-6 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT, DISCIPLINE, AND LAW

Class Program
Credits 3
This course offers effective ideas, strategies and tools for classroom management and discipline in the classroom that are within the guidelines of school law. Using literature from today’s educational leaders, students will examine and evaluate developmentally appropriate best practices of effective classroom management and discipline for grades K-6 with emphasis on behavioral norms and differences, physical space and organization, safety, and time and work management. Techniques will be explored as a means to minimizing behavior problems and establishing a productive and responsible classroom. Candidates will also be introduced to common policies and procedures for student conduct based on the law. Role play and participation in class will be a part of the course grade. Offered Jan Term and Summer 1A
Notes
Elective Course: Prerequisite Acceptance into Teacher Education; EDU372.

EDU 303: MATHEMATICS FOR THE ELEMENTARY CHILD

Class Program
Credits 3
Content includes systems of numeration and place value, fundamental operations of arithmetic, measurement, informal geometry, basic algebra, methods, and materials of elementary math. Students analyze Tactics for Thinking, curriculum frameworks, SC Mathematics Standards, NCTM Curriculum and Evaluation Standards, and school-to-work transition. This course is a prerequisite to EDU 412. Offered Fall and Spring Terms.
Notes
Major credit.

EDU 304 : INTRODUCTION TO CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES

Class Program
Credits 3

This course is a pre- or co-requisite course to all child and family study majors. It serves as an introductory study of the major theories of child, family, and community in the American system. The course concentrates on how these theories focus on child development, and how they take place in multiple settings. It looks at the people and agencies outside of the family. In addition, there is a concentration on the professional aspect needed in the major. We will discuss ongoing current issues in the field (state and national), the multiple organizations associated with the most relevant topics, and consider career opportunities in the ever-changing world of children, families, and communities.


 

Notes

Major credit for Child and Family Studies.

EDU 305: BEHAVIOR AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE YOUNG CHILD

Class Program
Credits 3

This course combines elements of learning theory and child growth and development with the actual observation of children. Special topics include self-esteem and confidence, multi-ethnic and pluralistic preschool settings, and principles of tests and measurements. This course covers the social, physical, emotional, and intellectual development of the child from prenatal through preadolescence  (8 years of age) and gives special emphasis to language acquisition and pre-operational thought. The course requires observation of children and is a prerequisite to EDU412b. Offered Fall Term.

Notes

Major credit for Early Childhood.

EDU 307: READING AND LANGUAGE IN THE EARLY CHILDHOOD CLASSROOM

Class Program
Credits 3

This course will equip the early childhood candidate with the tools necessary to provide instruction in literacy, diagnose and remediate struggling readers in the general education classroom. Along with analysis of various assessment data, the candidate will be involved with the study of the language arts; theoretical models for literacy development and learning; and the foundations of reading behaviors and stages of reading development.  R2S Literacy Course, students must earn a C or better in the course for certification.

Corequisites

EDU101.

Co-Requisite Courses
Notes

Major credit. Prerequisites for all education students: EDU360; PRAXIS CORE: Passing scores in reading, writing, and math; EDU309 (except for special education majors).

EDU 309: LITERATURE FOR THE CHILD

Class Program
Credits 3

This course acquaints the student with traditional and modern literature for children, interests of children of different age levels, criteria for evaluating children’s books, creative writing, and methods of integrating children’s literature into the curriculum. This course is a prerequisite to EDU 412a and 412b. R2S Literacy Course, students must earn a C or better in the course for certification.

Notes

GEP Writing Intensive; Major credit.

EDU 314: SCIENCE FOR THE CHILD

Class Program
Credits 3

This course is designed to familiarize students with science content in life sciences, physical sciences, and earth/space sciences appropriate for the elementary child (grades 2–6), to develop pedagogical skills in science, and to build positive attitudes toward science and science instruction. Candidates are provided with hands-on science experiences, preparation for the Praxis II exam, and field experiences. 

Notes

Major credit.

EDU 315: SOCIAL STUDIES FOR THE CHILD

Class Program
Credits 3
This course will focus on the content and methodology of social studies in the school. Students will study goals (knowledge, attitudes, values, and skills); objectives; content; materials; methods; scope and sequence; Curriculum Standards for the Social Studies (the National Council for the Social Studies); and evaluative techniques of the social studies. Offered Fall and Spring Terms.
Notes
Major credit.

EDU 327: TEACHING THROUGH THE ARTS

Class Program
Credits 3
Designed for those without previous art training, it guides teacher candidates in the exploration and use of the visual arts, music and dance, and creative integration of the arts into the basic curriculum for increased academic achievement.
Notes
Elective credit.

EDU 330: SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION

Class Program
Credits 1 3
Each special topics offering will cover a topic dealing with the field of Education or Special Education that is not in the regular curriculum. Offered Fall, January, or Spring Term.
Notes
Elective Credit.

EDU 336: LANGUAGE ARTS: INTEGRATING INTERMEDIATE READING AND WRITING

Class Program
Credits 3

This course focuses upon methodology for scaffolding reading and writing development of the student in intermediate grades. Teaching candidates will focus on the transition from beginning reading and writing to reading and writing in the content area. Effective strategies and materials for teaching the fluent reader and writer will be emphasized. A 15-hour clinical is required for the course and the student should register using www.tinyurl.com/clinicals. Offered Fall and Spring Terms.  R2S Course: Teacher candidates must earn a C or better for certification.

Notes

Major credit.

EDU 350: R2S READING FOUNDATIONS

Class Program
Credits 3

This course will examine the history and theories of literacy processes and instruction (reading and writing). Participants will engage in reading about current issues, history, theory, policy, evidence-based practice, and professional development in literacy instruction. Teacher candidates will explore their personal theory of how students gain literacy proficiency as well as closely examining other theoretical perspectives to empower educators to make complex decisions that connect theory, practices, and student learning. R2S Course, candidates must make a C or better for certification.

Notes

Major credit.

EDU 351: MIDDLE LEVEL PEDAGOGY AND ASSESSMENT

Class Program
Credits 3
Middle level candidates understand the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they use this knowledge in their practice. Middle level candidates understand the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research of effective instruction and assessment, and they employ a variety of strategies for a developmentally appropriate climate to meet the varying abilities and learning styles of all young adolescents.
Notes
Major credit.

EDU 352: MIDDLE LEVEL PHILOSOPHY AND SCHOOL ORGANIZATION

Class Program
Credits 3
Middle level teacher candidates understand the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work successfully within these organizational components.
Notes
Major credit.

EDU 353: MIDDLE LEVEL ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT

Class Program
Credits 3
This course will examine the intellectual, physical, social, emotional, and moral development of young adolescents in contemporary society. The course will examine the range of differences within young adolescents, implications for teaching and learning, and explore teaching strategies and school structures that capitalize on the developmental characteristics of young adolescents. During this course, you will also develop an understanding of the needs of all young adolescents, including relationships with peers and family. Finally, we will examine how young adolescents are portrayed in the media and explore the possible implications of these representations.
Notes
Major credit.

EDU 360: INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION

Class Program
Credits 3
This course is a pre- or corequisite to all education courses. This course is an introductory study of the historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of the American educational system; it should be the first course in a student’s education curriculum. It concentrates on current issues such as multicultural education, disabilities, affective, cognitive, and vocational education programs. The study reviews current impacts on curriculum, SC Standards, students, and teachers and examines career opportunities in education. Students begin the EXPANDED ADEPT portfolio and begin using the Converse electronic system powered by Livetext. Offered Fall, Spring, Jan, and once during summer terms.
Notes
Major credit.

EDU 361: CURRICULUM DESIGN AND CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

Class Program
Credits 3
The relationship among classroom diversity, management, assessment, short and long term planning and instruction are explored. Students will develop knowledge and skills in the interaction of these classroom elements. The course has an imbedded clinical. Offered Fall, Jan and Spring Terms.
Notes
Major credit.

EDU 372: DIAGNOSTICS AND METHODS IN ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM

Class Program
Credits 3
This course is designed to provide the teaching of reading methods in the 21st century classroom, and to build upon foundations laid in the Reading Clinical I course. Candidates will be immersed in literacy and reading instruction as they develop oral and communication skills with a focus on theory, literacy development, and the methods of teaching various literacy skills. They will employ planning and strategy instruction using diagnostic analysis to teach according to the five components of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) and the writing process. A 15-hour clinical will be required for candidates to practice their craft by teaching two literacy lessons and observing the teaching of literacy in the elementary classroom. Sign up for clinical using www.tinyurl.com/clinicals. Offered Fall and Spring Terms.
Prerequisites

EDU101, EDU301/307.

Notes
Major credit.

EDU 378: READING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES

Class Program
Credits 3

This course is primarily for students in special education. It includes methods and materials for a wide number of reading problems encountered among exceptional learners. The course emphasizes diagnosing reading difficulties and techniques of remediation. This course includes a clinical. R2S Literacy Course, students must earn a C or better in the course for certification.

Notes

Major credit.

EDU 382g: CLINICAL II: PRACTICUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Class Program
Credits 3
This course offered for students seeking early childhood add-on certification provides students an opportunity to observe, plan for and work with young children. Emphasis is upon the early childhood curriculum, the nature of the learner, and management of young children. Pass/fail grading.

EDU 387: LABORATORY SCIENCE MANAGEMENT- READING

Class Program
Credits 3

This course gives the prospective secondary science teacher an opportunity to develop the laboratory skills necessary to manage a laboratory and to design experiments, laboratory and field activities, and demonstrations. In addition, the student must satisfactorily complete required reading and assignments. This required course for prospective secondary science majors is available (with the approval of instructor) when there is a demand from juniors or seniors.

Prerequisites

Upper-class status and approval of instructor.

EDU 403: METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD

Class Program
Credits 3

This course is a hands-on, activity-oriented course designed to guide students in the preparation of teacher-made instructional materials in each area of the early childhood curriculum and the implementation of carefully prepared lessons for an actual early childhood setting. Students plan appropriate lessons. The course emphasizes language development and listening, speaking, writing, and reading readiness experiences; explores a variety of teaching techniques and organizational arrangements, and emphasizes individualized instruction. This course is a prerequisite to EDU 412b. Offered Spring and Summer Terms.

Notes

Major credit for Early Childhood.

EDU 405: CURRICULUM FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD

Class Program
Credits 3

Admission to Teacher Education is required. This course is a study of the curricular needs of early childhood (pk-3) children, a review of early childhood programs/settings, and an exploration of applying teaching/learning theory to the early childhood setting. Special topics include working with parents, classroom management techniques/strategies, and curricula in math, language arts, science, social studies, art, physical education, and music. Students make on-site visits to a Montessori school, a private kindergarten, public-school kindergartens, a university laboratory preschool, and a hospital-based child development center. This course is a prerequisite to EDU 412b. Offered Fall Term.

Notes

Major credit for Early Childhood.

EDU 409: ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM

Class Program
Credits 3
This course surveys each subject area of the modern elementary curriculum, trends and issues in curriculum development, teaching/learning theory, effective and efficient teacher characteristics or behaviors, effective communication skills between teacher and parent/child, techniques for diagnosing student abilities, and current structured programs of observation and analysis of different teaching models. Special topics include microcomputer literacy/usage; classroom discipline and management; principles of tests and measurements; use of audio-visual equipment; multicultural education; affective education; self- esteem; thinking skills (e.g., problem solving, critical thinking skills, etc.); parent involvement; awareness of differing economic; social, racial, and religious groups; development and analysis of teacher-made tests; and varying organizational sizes (individualized, small and large). This course is a prerequisite to student teaching in, elementary education, and early childhood education.
Notes
Major credit for Elementary and Early Childhood.

EDU 412a: DIRECTED STUDENT TEACHING: ELEMENTARY

Class Program
Credits 12

Students normally take this course, which integrates theory and practice, during the senior year. The 60-day course includes observation, participation, and directed teaching experience in a local public school. The experience requires conferences with the Program Director, University Supervisor, and the cooperating teacher, demonstration of the integration of technology into instruction, and attendance at such required seminars as training sessions, orientation sessions, and other workshops. The University Supervisor visits the student-teacher periodically during the semester. Students must request a student teaching placement by February 15 for Fall Term placement in the following year or by June 15 for Spring Term placement in the following year. Pass/fail grading. Offered Fall and Spring Terms. Special fee. Meets the GEP capstone, and writing-intensive requirements.

Notes

Major credit.

EDU 412b: DIRECTED STUDENT TEACHING: EARLY CHILDHOOD

Class Program
Credits 12

Students normally take this course, which integrates theory and practice, during the senior year. The 60-day course includes observation, participation, and directed teaching experience in a local public school. The experience requires conferences with the Program Director, University Supervisor, and the cooperating teacher, demonstration of the integration of technology into instruction, and attendance at such required seminars as training sessions, orientation sessions, and other workshops. The University Supervisor visits the student-teacher periodically during the semester. Students must request student teaching placement by June 15 for Spring Term placement in the following year or by February 15 for Fall Term placement in the following year. Pass/fail grading. Offered Fall and Spring Terms. Special fee. Meets the GEP capstone, and writing-intensive requirements.

Notes

Major credit.

EDU 412c: DIRECTED STUDENT TEACHING: SECONDARY

Class Program
Credits 12

Students normally take this course, which integrates theory and practice, during the senior year. The 60-day course includes observation, participation, and directed teaching experience in a local public school. The experience requires conferences with the Program Director, University Supervisor, and the cooperating teacher, demonstration of the integration of technology into instruction, and attendance at such required seminars as training sessions, orientation sessions, and other workshops. The University Supervisor visits the student-teacher periodically during the semester. Students must apply for student teaching by June 15 for Spring Term placement in the following year or by February 15 for Fall Term placement in the following year. Pass/fail grading. Offered Fall and Spring Terms. Special fee. Meets the GEP capstone and writing intensive requirements.

Notes

Major credit.

EDU 412h: DIRECTED STUDENT TEACHING IN ART

Class Program
Credits 12

Students normally take this course, which integrates theory and practice, during the senior year. The 60-day course includes observation, participation, and directed teaching experience in both elementary and secondary local public schools. The experience requires conferences with the Program Director, University Supervisor, and the cooperating teacher, demonstration of the integration of technology into instruction, and attendance at such required seminars as training sessions, orientation sessions, and other workshops. The University Supervisor visits the student-teacher periodically during the semester. Students must apply for student teaching by June 15 for Spring Term placement in the following year or by February 15 for Fall Term placement in the following year. Pass/fail grading. Offered Fall and Spring Terms. Special fee. Meets the GEP capstone and writing intensive requirements.

Notes

Major credit.

EDU 425: TEACHING OF READING: CONTENT AREAS

Class Program
Credits 3

Corequisite for art students: ART 316L. EDU 201 is a prerequisite to EDU 202 Clinical. EDU 202 must accompany or follow EDU 425. Admission to Teacher Education. This course assists teachers in the teaching of reading in a variety of content areas. Teachers will learn to develop study guides, introduce content area texts, use study plans, determine reading expectancy and levels, develop comprehension questions at various levels, and assess the readability of text materials. Offered Fall Term. R2S Endorsement course, candidates must earn a C or better for certification.

Notes

Minor credit. Prerequisites for prospective secondary teachers: EDU 201.

EDU 450: INTERNSHIP IN CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES

Class Program
Credits 3

This course is the capstone and experiential component for the Child and Family Studies (CFS) major. Only declared CFS majors may sign up for this course. The course places CFS majors in the community, embedded in organizations that emphasize improving and enhancing the quality of life for families and children. Those who seek to work with families and children in the community need to be aware of national and state best practices in improving and enhancing the quality of life for families and children. Students will be embedded in an organization that seeks to improve the quality of life for families and children. This internship will be a minimum of 60 hours over the course of a semester (fall or spring). Students will be responsible for documenting and reporting on their experience in the final class and at the campus-wide Intern Expo. Content will vary dependent on organization with which student is placed.

Notes

Major credit. Capstone.

EDU 490: DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SPECIAL TOPICS

Class Program
Credits 1 3
This course is an academic experience in a special topic not covered in depth in regular course work. The student works independently and researches a topic approved by a faculty member in the department. The instructor prescribes the specific requirements (normally one or more papers). Students must observe the University limit of hours within a discipline. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites

Permission of instructor.

Notes
Major credit.

EDU 497: HONORS IN EDUCATION

Class Program
Credits 3
This course is for qualified students pursuing honors in education. Students either complete independent research and write a paper or conduct action research and write a paper in conjunction with field experiences.
Notes
Major credit.